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We're home after a week on Wrightsville where the weather was lovely and the kids had a blast boogie boarding and building in the sand. I enjoyed quality time in my beach chair and on the hammock on the wraparound porch of the beach house we were staying in. There was also lots of good food to be consumed. I don't mind bringing home the good memories, it's the extra vacation pounds that I could live without. ;)

Anyway, since I completely ignored work, I managed to get a lot of reading done. Here's the rundown of my reading from 8/11-8/17.

#71-Midnighters: The Secret Hour by Scott Westerfeld. A very engaging YA series recommended to me by a friend. The premise being that there's a secret 25th hour that happens at the stroke of midnight that only those born at midnight can access. Those who can have special powers that only work then. I'm going to get the series for J for her birthday next week.

#72-Midnighters: Touching Darkness by Scott Westerfeld. The second in the series.

#73-The Red Queen by Margaret Drabble. I really liked Drabble's writing style, but I was never quite sure what the point of the book actually was. The first section, which is told in first person using the character of a Korean Crown Princess from over 200 years ago and which was based heavily on her autobiographical writings was fascinating however.

#74-Wishing by Miranda Jarrett. The obligatory cheesy romance beach reading. What would the beach be without brain candy right? It seemed eminently suitable to read a book about a dashing sea captain while sitting next to the crashing surf. lol

#75-Who Will Run the Frog Hospital? by Lorrie Moore. A quirky little novella with gorgeous writing that my mother-in-law brought with her to the beach. I'll be checking to see if this author has written anything else because her use of language is gorgeous.

#76-The Whistling Season by Ivan Doig. I've never read anything by him before, but this was a lovely novel that recreates a vanished period of the West. I very much enjoyed this.

#77-A Home at the End of the World by Michael Cunningham. An interesting book with rotating points of view. Gives insight into how there is often a great divide between the way we see ourselves and the way that others perceive us.

#78-Vanishing Acts by Jodi Picoult. I read one of hers at the beach last year so it seemed fitting to do another. Picoult is a formula writer, but it's a good formula. I thought that the resolution was more than a little pat, but the book held my interest.

I also started an adult novel (Adverbs) by Daniel Handler (the guy who writes the Lemony Snicket books) thinking that I'd give him another chance as I hated the first LS, but I put it down after the first 30 pages or so. He's just not my cup of tea I guess.

Now, it's back to doing the mound of sheets and towels we lugged home. Hope the last week was good to all of you. :)
angela_o: (Default)
We're home after a week on Wrightsville where the weather was lovely and the kids had a blast boogie boarding and building in the sand. I enjoyed quality time in my beach chair and on the hammock on the wraparound porch of the beach house we were staying in. There was also lots of good food to be consumed. I don't mind bringing home the good memories, it's the extra vacation pounds that I could live without. ;)

Anyway, since I completely ignored work, I managed to get a lot of reading done. Here's the rundown of my reading from 8/11-8/17.

#71-Midnighters: The Secret Hour by Scott Westerfeld. A very engaging YA series recommended to me by a friend. The premise being that there's a secret 25th hour that happens at the stroke of midnight that only those born at midnight can access. Those who can have special powers that only work then. I'm going to get the series for J for her birthday next week.

#72-Midnighters: Touching Darkness by Scott Westerfeld. The second in the series.

#73-The Red Queen by Margaret Drabble. I really liked Drabble's writing style, but I was never quite sure what the point of the book actually was. The first section, which is told in first person using the character of a Korean Crown Princess from over 200 years ago and which was based heavily on her autobiographical writings was fascinating however.

#74-Wishing by Miranda Jarrett. The obligatory cheesy romance beach reading. What would the beach be without brain candy right? It seemed eminently suitable to read a book about a dashing sea captain while sitting next to the crashing surf. lol

#75-Who Will Run the Frog Hospital? by Lorrie Moore. A quirky little novella with gorgeous writing that my mother-in-law brought with her to the beach. I'll be checking to see if this author has written anything else because her use of language is gorgeous.

#76-The Whistling Season by Ivan Doig. I've never read anything by him before, but this was a lovely novel that recreates a vanished period of the West. I very much enjoyed this.

#77-A Home at the End of the World by Michael Cunningham. An interesting book with rotating points of view. Gives insight into how there is often a great divide between the way we see ourselves and the way that others perceive us.

#78-Vanishing Acts by Jodi Picoult. I read one of hers at the beach last year so it seemed fitting to do another. Picoult is a formula writer, but it's a good formula. I thought that the resolution was more than a little pat, but the book held my interest.

I also started an adult novel (Adverbs) by Daniel Handler (the guy who writes the Lemony Snicket books) thinking that I'd give him another chance as I hated the first LS, but I put it down after the first 30 pages or so. He's just not my cup of tea I guess.

Now, it's back to doing the mound of sheets and towels we lugged home. Hope the last week was good to all of you. :)

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